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Tuesday, 06 December 2022 00:00

The foot condition that is known as Morton’s neuroma can cause debilitating pain and discomfort. This is an ailment that affects the nerve which lies between the third and fourth toes, causing it to become thickened and irritated. It is a condition that can be common among women who frequently wear high heels. These types of shoes generally have little area in the toe box, prohibiting the toes to move freely. Patients who have Morton’s neuroma often liken the pain in their feet to having a pebble or marble in their shoe. Additionally, there may be a burning sensation in the ball of the foot, as a result of extreme inflammation. There may be existing conditions affecting the feet which can lead to getting this condition, including bunions, flat feet, or high arches. A proper diagnosis consists of pressing on specific areas of the affected foot, and an X-ray may be taken to rule out fractures or arthritis. The discomfort from this ailment is difficult to ignore, and if you are afflicted with this type of pain, please schedule an appointment with a podiatrist as quickly as possible who can help you to find relief.

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Gordon Fosdick of Affiliated Foot Care Center. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Middlefield and Wallingford, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about What is Morton's Neuroma?
Tuesday, 29 November 2022 00:00

The foot is made up of three parts, the forefoot consisting of the toes, the midfoot made up of the small navicular, cuneiform, and cuboid bones, and the hindfoot consisting of the lower ankle and heel. The Lisfranc joint is at the connection of the forefoot and midfoot. An injury to this joint can involve a dislocation, where there is a separation of the normal joint alignment between the forefoot and the midfoot, or a broken bone, usually in the midfoot. This typically happens when the foot is in a downward, pointed position and someone lands on top of it. It can also occur from an auto accident, an awkward step on an uneven surface, or a fall. If you have pain or swelling in the midfoot and it hurts to walk or stand, see a podiatrist for a proper diagnosis and treatment plan ranging from a walking cast to surgery depending on severity.

A broken foot requires immediate medical attention and treatment. If you need your feet checked, contact Dr. Gordon Fosdick from Affiliated Foot Care Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Broken Foot Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment

A broken foot is caused by one of the bones in the foot typically breaking when bended, crushed, or stretched beyond its natural capabilities. Usually the location of the fracture indicates how the break occurred, whether it was through an object, fall, or any other type of injury. 

Common Symptoms of Broken Feet:

  • Bruising
  • Pain
  • Redness
  • Swelling
  • Blue in color
  • Numbness
  • Cold
  • Misshapen
  • Cuts
  • Deformities

Those that suspect they have a broken foot shoot seek urgent medical attention where a medical professional could diagnose the severity.

Treatment for broken bones varies depending on the cause, severity and location. Some will require the use of splints, casts or crutches while others could even involve surgery to repair the broken bones. Personal care includes the use of ice and keeping the foot stabilized and elevated.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Middlefield and Wallingford, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment for a Broken Foot
Tuesday, 22 November 2022 00:00

Weightlifting can be an exciting, motivating sport to participate in. It can also result in a risk of injury to the feet. Lifting heavy weights while doing squats or lunges can put significant stress on the feet. Overtraining, not taking enough time to recover between weightlifting sessions, and wearing improper footwear for the sport are among the things that can impact the pressure put on your body and feet. The most common injuries in weightlifting that can cause foot pain are plantar fasciitis, stress fractures, and muscle strains. Treatment varies by injury, but rest may help alleviate foot pain. If your pain does not go away or worsens, contact a podiatrist for a diagnosis and treatment so that you can get back to training as soon as possible.

Sports related foot and ankle injuries require proper treatment before players can go back to their regular routines. For more information, contact Dr. Gordon Fosdick of Affiliated Foot Care Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries

Foot and ankle injuries are a common occurrence when it comes to athletes of any sport. While many athletes dismiss the initial aches and pains, the truth is that ignoring potential foot and ankle injuries can lead to serious problems. As athletes continue to place pressure and strain the area further, a mild injury can turn into something as serious as a rupture and may lead to a permanent disability. There are many factors that contribute to sports related foot and ankle injuries, which include failure to warm up properly, not providing support or wearing bad footwear. Common injuries and conditions athletes face, including:

  • Plantar Fasciitis
  • Plantar Fasciosis
  • Achilles Tendinitis
  • Achilles Tendon Rupture
  • Ankle Sprains

Sports related injuries are commonly treated using the RICE method. This includes rest, applying ice to the injured area, compression and elevating the ankle. More serious sprains and injuries may require surgery, which could include arthroscopic and reconstructive surgery. Rehabilitation and therapy may also be required in order to get any recovering athlete to become fully functional again. Any unusual aches and pains an athlete sustains must be evaluated by a licensed, reputable medical professional.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Middlefield and Wallingford, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Sports Related Foot and Ankle Injuries
Tuesday, 15 November 2022 00:00

Having flat feet is a foot condition that affects approximately 8 million people in the country. It is noticeable by the absence of an arch in the foot, and it can cause some people pain and discomfort. The majority of babies are born with flat feet, and the arch generally develops fully in the teenage years. Some adults will never have an arch, and this may affect certain parts of their lives. A common concern that is held by people who have flat feet and are interested in joining the military consists of being qualified for certain branches of service. In the past, military enlistment was not permitted for people with flat feet, but that policy has recently been changed. People who have this condition are allowed to enter the military, providing there are no obvious symptoms. However, if there is foot pain or swelling from flat feet, the interested person will be barred from enlisting. If you have questions about flat feet and how it contributes to enlisting in the military, please contact a podiatrist, who can answer any questions and concerns you may have.

Flatfoot is a condition many people suffer from. If you have flat feet, contact Dr. Gordon Fosdick from Affiliated Foot Care Center. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

What Are Flat Feet?

Flatfoot is a condition in which the arch of the foot is depressed and the sole of the foot is almost completely in contact with the ground. About 20-30% of the population generally has flat feet because their arches never formed during growth.

Conditions & Problems:

Having flat feet makes it difficult to run or walk because of the stress placed on the ankles.

Alignment – The general alignment of your legs can be disrupted, because the ankles move inward which can cause major discomfort.

Knees – If you have complications with your knees, flat feet can be a contributor to arthritis in that area.  

Symptoms

  • Pain around the heel or arch area
  • Trouble standing on the tip toe
  • Swelling around the inside of the ankle
  • Flat look to one or both feet
  • Having your shoes feel uneven when worn

Treatment

If you are experiencing pain and stress on the foot you may weaken the posterior tibial tendon, which runs around the inside of the ankle. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Middlefield and Wallingford, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about What is Flexible Flat Foot?
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