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Middlefield (860) 349-8500
Wallingford (203) 294-4977

Tuesday, 16 August 2022 00:00

Most sprained ankles occur when the ankle rolls outward as the foot twists inward. This causes the ligaments on the outside of the ankle to stretch and possibly tear. With a mild sprain, the ankle may be sore and stiff. It may swell slightly, but you should be able to walk with minor pain. As the severity of the sprain increases, your ankle may become bruised and tender, making walking far more painful. With a severe sprain, the ankle joint will feel unstable, and bearing weight is not possible. Ankle sprains can take a while to heal, but this long process is important to avoid re-spraining the ankle or developing chronic ankle problems. If you hear a popping sound at the time of the sprain, please see a podiatrist immediately. You will undergo an exam and be given a treatment schedule that may include pain medication, exercises, or bracing to protect the joint and allow it to heal properly. In some cases surgery may be required. 

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact Dr. Gordon Fosdick from Affiliated Foot Care Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Middlefield and Wallingford, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Sunday, 14 August 2022 00:00

If left untreated, an ingrown toenail can lead to more serious concerns, such as an infection. Knowing proper nail care can help in the prevention of an ingrown toenail. Give us a call, and get treated!

Tuesday, 09 August 2022 00:00

The foot condition that is known as Morton’s neuroma affects the nerve between the third and fourth toes. In severe cases, it is quite painful. This can possibly be treated without surgery in the beginning stages. It happens as a result of wearing shoes that do not have adequate room for the toes to move freely in. High heels fit into this category, and it is suggested to refrain from frequently wearing them. The nerve can gradually become compressed, and it will feel like there is a pebble in the sock or shoe. Additional symptoms can consist of burning pain and numbness in the toes. The pain may radiate to the ball of the foot, and it can be difficult to complete daily activities. A qualified doctor can perform a diagnosis by having an X-ray taken, and this can be helpful in ruling out a stress fracture. An MRI or ultrasound can also be performed, and these can eliminate conditions that may include bursitis and Freiberg’s disease. Some patients find it helpful to stretch the Achilles tendon and plantar fascia, which are located on the bottom of the foot. This may help to reduce a portion of the pain. If you have Morton’s neuroma, it is suggested that you meet with a podiatrist who can recommend the best treatment for you.

 

Morton’s neuroma is a very uncomfortable condition to live with. If you think you have Morton’s neuroma, contact Dr. Gordon Fosdick of Affiliated Foot Care Center. Our doctor will attend to all of your foot care needs and answer any of your related questions.  

Morton’s Neuroma

Morton's neuroma is a painful foot condition that commonly affects the areas between the second and third or third and fourth toe, although other areas of the foot are also susceptible. Morton’s neuroma is caused by an inflamed nerve in the foot that is being squeezed and aggravated by surrounding bones.

What Increases the Chances of Having Morton’s Neuroma?

  • Ill-fitting high heels or shoes that add pressure to the toe or foot
  • Jogging, running or any sport that involves constant impact to the foot
  • Flat feet, bunions, and any other foot deformities

Morton’s neuroma is a very treatable condition. Orthotics and shoe inserts can often be used to alleviate the pain on the forefront of the feet. In more severe cases, corticosteroids can also be prescribed. In order to figure out the best treatment for your neuroma, it’s recommended to seek the care of a podiatrist who can diagnose your condition and provide different treatment options.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our offices located in Middlefield and Wallingford, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 02 August 2022 00:00

The feet are considered to be the foundation of the body. Their function is to provide stability and balance to the body, in addition to making it possible to stand, walk and run. Children’s feet grow rapidly to keep up with the rest of their bodies, and will grow faster during puberty. As the child approaches adulthood, the bones in the feet become larger, and will continue to grow until the age of approximately twenty. There are 26 bones in each foot, and the bones in both feet add up to one quarter of the bones in the body. An interesting fact is the feet have the most sweat glands per square centimeter, and 125,000 of them are located on each sole. Additionally, the feet have 8000 nerve endings, and this can contribute to the feet being one of the most ticklish areas of the body. Research has indicated that toenails grow slower than fingernails, and a toenail can take 12 to 18 months to fully grow. If you would like to know more about foot structure, and interesting information about the feet, please consult with a podiatrist. 

If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Dr. Gordon Fosdick from Affiliated Foot Care Center. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Biomechanics in Podiatry

Podiatric biomechanics is a particular sector of specialty podiatry with licensed practitioners who are trained to diagnose and treat conditions affecting the foot, ankle and lower leg. Biomechanics deals with the forces that act against the body, causing an interference with the biological structures. It focuses on the movement of the ankle, the foot and the forces that interact with them.

A History of Biomechanics

  • Biomechanics dates back to the BC era in Egypt where evidence of professional foot care has been recorded.
  • In 1974, biomechanics gained a higher profile from the studies of Merton Root, who claimed that by changing or controlling the forces between the ankle and the foot, corrections or conditions could be implemented to gain strength and coordination in the area.

Modern technological improvements are based on past theories and therapeutic processes that provide a better understanding of podiatric concepts for biomechanics. Computers can provide accurate information about the forces and patterns of the feet and lower legs.

Understanding biomechanics of the feet can help improve and eliminate pain, stopping further stress to the foot.

If you have any questions please feel free to contact our offices located in Middlefield and Wallingford, CT . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Biomechanics in Podiatry
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